Queen Street Masonic Heritage Trust

Registered Charity 1076186

The Trust

Phoenix Lodge No 94

250th Anniversary 

1755 - 2005

Brief History


The celebration of the 250th Anniversary of the Lodge offers us an excellent opportunity of reviewing, albeit briefly, the rich history of a unique Lodge.

 

Unique, because of the uninterrupted sequence of its meetings and its association with many of the noteworthy events which occurred in the life of Sunderland during the latter half of the 18th century and the early 19th century.

 

Indeed an examination of the published histories of Sunderland illustrates that many notable “local” dignitaries and public officials of those times were Masons some being members of Phoenix Lodge or having some Masonic connection with it.

 

The history of the lodge dates back to 1755 and thereby establishes its claim to be the senior lodge of freemasons in Sunderland in terms of its age. Although there are other lodges possessing a lower number than Phoenix Lodge, some of them are of a later date. This is because when the various lodges were enrolled under the “United Grand Lodge of England” they were allocated new numbers by some other criteria than that of “ancient rights”.

 

The number of the lodge was originally 207 but during the early years was changed several times because of the removal of lapsed lodges from the lists and the Union of Grand Lodges. The numbers and dates of these changes are as follows:-

 

1755 - No.207

1792 - No.121

1770 - No.169

1814 - No.146

1780 - No.135

1832 - No.111

1881 - No.136

1863 - No.94

 

Although the year 1755 is the date given as the earliest record of a Constituted or Warranted Lodge in Sunderland, there is evidence to suggest that there were masons in the district prior to that date. Indeed evidence indicates that a Lodge, probably a “Time Immemorial Lodge”, pre-dated the Phoenix Lodge. This is supported by the fact that it is recorded in the minutes of the Marquis of Granby Lodge, Durham, that on the 24th April 1745 “Bro. Stobart, a mason made at Sunderland entered himself a member of the Lodge”. Other similar references to masons from Sunderland are also mentioned in the minutes prior to 1755.

 

The original warrant for the constitution of Phoenix Lodge was issued by the Marquis of Canarvon, Grand Master of the “Moderns” and dated October 7th 1755. The Consecration took place on November 25th of the same year when the Brethren walked in procession to church where a sermon was preached by the Rev. Barwise from Dalton, who, being a Freemason, performed the same service as he had for other Lodges on similar occasions.

 

There is no existing record to indicate which church was attended on this great occasion. St. John’s Church was not opened until 14 years later and, therefore, the evidence is in favour of Holy Trinity Church, better known as Sunderland Parish Church. This church, of course, still stands today and is where our Service of Thanksgiving was held on September 10th 2005.

 

Following the Consecration, the Lodge first met in the Golden Lion Inn, which at that time, was the chief hostelry in the town. However, the Brethren appear to have moved about from one meeting place to another during the 23 years before the erection of the first Freemasons’ Hall in 1778. The following are known meeting places: -

 

Golden Lion Inn - 1755

Masons Arms - 1756

Sign of the King - 1764

Nag’s Head, Church Street - 1766

King’s Arms - 1768

Golden Lion Inn - 1770

Freemasons’ Hall, Vine Street - 1778

(This was destroyed by fire November 1783)

Bro. Jowsey’s George Hotel - 1783

Freemasons’ Hall, Queen Street East - 1785

 

The desire for a permanent Masonic home for the Lodge did not come to fruition until 1778 thanks being due to the efforts and enthusiasm of Bro. Captain George Thompson who was Master for a period of 7 years up to 1782. During that time at least 130 candidates were admitted to the Lodge many of whom were leading figures in the town, thus adding considerable prestige to Lodge meetings. (It is interesting to note that Bro. Thompson was Provincial Grand Master 1775 - 1782).

 

This original Hall was built by Bro. Thompson and let to the Brethren of the Lodge as a Lodge Room. T.O. Todd’s “History of Phoenix Lodge” published in 1906 states that the present Hall in Queen Street was built on the site of the of the original Hall although, early in the 1930’s, this was found not to be the case.

 

It is known that the Hall originally built by Bro. Thompson in 1778 was destroyed by fire on November 19th 1783 although it was not until the early 1930’s that W.Bro. William Waples, a prominent local Masonic Historian, discovered that the building was, in fact, situated in Vine Street - some 250 metres to the east of the present Hall.

 

The building had obviously not been completely destroyed by the fire of 1783 but had been renovated and used for a variety of commercial purposes over the years prior to its eventual demolition in January 1937. However, before that date, and on the basis that some evidence of previous Masonic use remained, a joint Instruction Lodge was held in the building with the Brethren of St. Johns Lodge No.80

 

Having been accustomed to meeting in their own purpose built Hall the Brethren must have been deeply saddened by its destruction. It is not surprising therefore that such an active zealous Mason as Dr. Tipping Brown should be well supported when he took steps to raise subscriptions for the erection of a new building.

 

Land was purchased in nearby Queen Street from a Bro. William Irving for £80 and the funds for the project were raised by the issue of shares of £20 each upon which the holders were to receive interest at the rate of 4% per annum. In this way a total of £360 was raised, the balance to be provided by voluntary or other subscriptions from other Brethren who were to be repaid after the shareholders had all been satisfied.

 

Matters progressed so quickly that within nine months of the fire, Bro. Dr. Tipping Brown as Master of the Lodge, was able to lay the Foundation Stone of the new Hall. This was done with full Masonic ceremony on August 5th 1784 and in the presence of a large gathering of Freemasons.

 

The building work proceeded quickly under the direction of the architect Bro. John Bonner who was a member of the Lodge.

 

The building work and interior was completed in a matter of months and on Tuesday April 5th 1785, the Hall was dedicated with the usual Masonic ceremonies and the event attracted considerable interest both locally and amongst Freemasons from other areas of the country.

 

Indeed Garbutt in his History of Sunderland describes the event as being “one of the most brilliant meetings Freemasonry had ever witnessed in this part of the Kingdom”.

 

A service was held in St. Johns Church which had been consecrated in 1769. The service was enriched with a performance of Handel’s Messiah by the Choir of Durham Cathedral.

 

Bro. the Rev. Thomas Hall, Chaplain of the Lodge, delivered an Oration suitable for the occasion and the celebrations were concluded with a sumptuous dinner provided for the 176 Brethren who were present.

 

The earliest Master on record is Bro. John Thornhill who was Initiated 3 months after the Consecration of the Lodge. However, whilst an authoritative list of Worshipful Masters can be produced from 1775 up to the present day, the names of Masters prior to that date are very few. We do know however, that the following Brethren did at some time between 1755 and 1774 occupy the Master’s chair:-

 

John Thornhill

George Ogilvie

Dr. Isaac Brown (Father of Dr. Tipping Brown)

William Gooch (Comptroller of the Customs)

Robert Inman

 

A full list of Worshipful Masters is set out in the Appendix along with a more detailed study of Dr. Tipping Brown to whom the Lodge is indebted in so many ways.

 

One of the most interesting records in possession of the Lodge is the First Register in which each Brother signed his name at the time of Initiation. The volume had apparently been first brought into use about 10 years after the Consecration. Whilst the information contained in the book is, perhaps incomplete, at the front there is a copy of the first set of Bye-Laws of the Lodge which, for ease of reference, are set out at the end of this booklet.

 

The original Warrant of the Lodge having evidently been destroyed in the fire of 1783, the Brethren appear to have conducted the business of the Lodge for a considerable number of years without applying for a Confirmation Warrant.

 

A Warrant of Confirmation was finally applied for and granted on September 29th 1821 and was received by the Lodge in February of the following year from John George Lambton, Provincial Grand Master for the Province of Durham.

 

This is displayed in the Lodge Room at Queen Street and is also reproduced at the end of this booklet for the information of the Brethren.

 

The Centenary of the Lodge appears to have been a rather “low key” affair and should have been celebrated in October 1855. For some unknown reason it was deferred until April of the following year. Although the Lodge at that time had 100 members it would appear that the only demonstration of the occasion was the holding of a dinner in the Lodge Room which was attended by 49 Brethren.

 

The minute book records:- “17th April 1856. The centenary of this Lodge was celebrated by a sumptuous dinner at 7 o’clock p.m. Tickets, 3/- each (15p) provided by Bro. James Spark which gave satisfaction to all present”. (This follows a list of 34 members and 15 visitors who were present).

 

The minutes continue:- “After dinner the W.M. ordered the Brethren present to be robed. The Lodge was then opened in the First Degree and the evening was spent with the greatest harmony and closed at 11.30 p.m.”

 

The 150th Anniversary is recorded as having been a much more fitting occasion which had been eagerly anticipated by the Brethren of the Lodge and accomplished with enthusiasm on Wednesday October 4th 1905.

 

In addition to a large gathering from the local Lodges, representatives were present from neighbouring Provinces together with Senior Brethren from the Provincial Grand Lodge of Durham, including the Provincial Grand Master, the Rt. Hon. Lord Barnard.

 

Todd’s “History of Phoenix Lodge” records:- “After the Lodge had been opened in the usual Masonic form, the Brethren were formed into processional order, and, headed by the Police Band, marched by way of Queen Street, until Sunderland Parish Church was reached.

 

Large numbers of people lined the route of the procession, and nothing of the kind had taken place in the district within memory of the inhabitants.

 

At the Church the arrangements were well carried out. Places were set apart for the families of Freemasons and the general public; the Freemasons, themselves, being accommodated in the body of the Church”.

 

It is interesting to note that the Sermon was given by Bro. the Rev. Thomas Randell, PProvGChaplain, the Chaplain of Phoenix Lodge and Rector of the Parish Church.

 

An offertory was taken on behalf of the 1906 Fund which raised over £10.

 

After the service, the procession returned to the Lodge by way of Coronation Street and, after light refreshments, the Brethren re[1]assembled in the Lodge Room and continued the proceedings of the Lodge.

 

ro. J.D. Todd, P.M. then gave a short history of the Lodge after which the Provincial Grand Master, Lord Barnard, gave an address.

 

A Candidate was then Initiated and the Lodge closed.

 

The celebrations were concluded with a Ball which was held in Mr. Wetherell’s Assembly Rooms, The Green, where dancing continued until the early hours of the morning.

 

It is interesting to note that the Bi-Centenary Celebrations held on October 5th 1955 took place at the Wearside Masonic Temple in Burdon Road, this being due to the difficulties in accommodating a large number of Brethren at Queen Street.

 

The details of the auspicious occasion are well recorded in the Official Gazette of the Province of Durham for November 1955.

 

On this occasion, the Lodge was honoured with the attendance of the M.W. The Grand Master, the Earl of Scarbrough accompanied by the Grand Secretary and the Deputy D. of C.

 

The Provincial Grand Master, R.W. Bro. Ernest Dixon was also in attendance together with his Deputy and Assistant Provincial Grand Masters.

 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 3.00 p.m. by the Master, W.Bro. C.W. Kirkaldy and after the Dispensation and the Minutes were read, the Provincial Grand Master and a Deputation from Provincial Grand Lodge were received and saluted by the Brethren present.

 

The M.W. Grand Master and Deputation from Grand Lodge were then received and saluted following which the Master of the Lodge warmly welcomed the Grand Master. A short address on the history of the Lodge was than given by W.Bro. William Waples, PProvGW, Chaplain and this was followed by an Oration given by the Provincial Grand Chaplain, the Rev. R Thornhill, M.A.

 

The Master then presented a cheque for £400 to the Provincial Grand Master for the R.M.I. Boys 1959 Festival The Lodge was then closed in due and solemn form with a rendition of the first verse of the National Anthem and the Closing Ode.

 

Tea was then served at 5p.m. followed by an exhibition of books, manuscripts, records, regalia and jewels this being prior to the serving of dinner at 7.p.m.

 

The usual toasts befitting the occasion were honoured after which the proceedings closed, all Brethren present having enjoyed a most memorable and convivial occasion.

 

The unique Phoenix Lodge Tracing Cloths illustrated below are of great historical interest and are thought to be dated 1815. The painter of the cloths is not known although at about the same time as the Phoenix Cloths were made, a Mr. Waddle of Bishopwearmouth designed three cloths for the Lodge at Kendall (sic). They have been restored on at least two occasions, firstly in 1954 as one of the events to mark the occasion of the Bi-Centenary the following year. From as early as 1933 the cloths have periodically been the subject of Lecture-Demonstrations and continue to stimulate considerable interest by the Brethren and Masonic Historians.

 

Phoenix Lodge had always owned the building, however in 1997, in order to safeguard the Brethren of the Lodge who faced a great financial burden because of major work needed to the structure, ownership was transferred to Queen Street Masonic Heritage Centre Ltd. In concluding this brief, but factual account of the history of Phoenix Lodge, I am very conscious of the fact that it is but a flavour of its long and striking career.

 

I hope, however, that those Brethren who take the trouble to read this will be encouraged and sufficiently stimulated to embark on further reading. You will then discover the historic details of the Lodge, its early and distinguished members, and unique features of its Lodge Room.

 

Brief History: W.Bro. A. Keith Herbert, PM, PPrJGW

Appendix

 

Dr. Tipping Brown, to whom the Phoenix Lodge is indebted in so many ways, (and especially for his efforts in the rebuilding of the Hall after the disastrous fire), was the son of Dr. Isaac Brown, one of the earliest Brethren to occupy the Chair of this Lodge; hence, the subject of this brief sketch was the “Worthy Son of a worthy Mason.”

 

The father was a physician of some eminence in the town, and in after years his son was frequently surprised on looking over his father’s notes, to find how greatly in many instances he had anticipated the later discoveries in the science of medicine.

 

Dr. Tipping Brown was educated at Newcastle under the supervision of eminent instructors, from whom he imbibed those classical and literary principles which afterwards pervaded all his pursuits.

 

In May, 1776, he was Initiated into Masonry, and im-mediately thereafter left Sunderland to take up his medical studies at the College of Edinburgh. During his five years’ residence in that city the objects of his intended profession claimed his first attention, but did not deter his mind from ranging with ardour over the whole course of general philosophy. Here he became a member of the Physical Society, of which he was elected president 1779 to 1781.

 

In 1778 he was elected a member of the Royal Medical Society. At this period also, the muses had some share of his application, and many translations as well as original pieces were produced, whilst some of his prose essays were eagerly accepted by the leading publications of the day.

 

After taking the Degree of M.D. in 1781, he settled down in his native town of Sunderland and resided with his mother on the Bishopwearmouth Walk. This walk was a pleasant parade which extended from Bedford Street to East Cross Street on the North side of High street. It consisted of three-storied houses, with gardens, flowers and pear trees.

 

Immediately after his return to Sunderland he renewed his association with the Brethren of the Lodge, and, as has already been related, was instrumental in having the Hall rebuilt.

 

His first term as Master of the Lodge was from 1781 to 1787, and his second term from 1790 to 1796, a total period of twelve years. In 1793 he was Provincial Senior Grand Warden.

 

In addition to the educational qualifications already enumerated, our Brother was an excellent musician, both in theory and practice, and was not averse to exercising his highest gifts on behalf of the Craft. The Ode written by him for the Dedication Ceremony of the New Hall proves the extent of his ability and literary taste. In all matters patriotic or local, he was ever ready with his pen and his purse to prove himself a loyal subject and a good citizen. His benefactions to the poor were most extensive, and although his surgery was generally well filled with patients waiting their turn, the good doctor was ever ready to prescribe for his poorer neighbours without fee or reward. Nor was his benevolence confined to those who sought his aid.

 

Through his endeavors a branch of the Humane Society was established in Sunderland for the purpose of life-saving, the scope of this, however, was too restricted, and a Dispensary was established. This again was found inadequate, and in later years it blossomed forth and became what is now the Sunderland Infirmary, which, in addition to its widespread out-patient work, provides 210 beds for in-door patients, and requires an annual income of about £10,000 to carry on its beneficent operations. It is worthy of being noted that in 1889 the Freemasons of the town furnished one of the Wards, and that at each festive gathering after the Lodge duties, it is customary to make a collection on behalf of the funds of this Institution. In connection with these early benevolent enterprises Doctor Brown acted as one of the physicians, and, notwithstanding the many demands which must have been made upon him, he yet found opportunities for developing other sides of the social life of the town, and was most directly connected with the formation of the Sunderland Subscription Library. An account of this will be briefly given in the biographical notes on Bro. James F. Stanfield. There is an excellent oil-painting of Dr. Brown in the Subscription Library reading room.

 

When reviewing the remarkable developments which followed the early efforts of our noteworthy Brethren, as shown by this chapter and others which follow, one is compelled to admit that “they builded better than they knew,” and the reflection that they were members of the Phoenix Lodge must be highly gratifying to those who have entered the circle of No. 94.

 

Dr. Brown died in 1811, but the only Masonic reference thereto is that in the Minute Book under date of 18th July, which reads : “Memo: W. Master and T. Harrison, Secretary, attended the funeral of Dr. Brown in a post chaise”.

 

The last entry of his attendance at the Lodge is on March 2nd, 1803.

 

(Extract from The History of Phoenix Lodge No.94 – by T.O. Todd)


Appendix: W.Bro. John James, PM, PPrGReg, Master

Photo - Dr. Tipping Brown

 

Photo - Phoenix Lodge 1º Tracing Cloth

 

Photo - Phoenix Lodge 2º Tracing Cloth

 

Photo - Phoenix Lodge 3º Tracing Cloth

The First Bye-Laws

 

We, whose Names are hereto Subscribed and Sett (sic) being Brethren and Members of the Antient and honourable Society of Free and Accepted Masons in Sunderland. Do hereby Consent and Agree to conform to the sundry Articles hereinafter mentioned and contained.

 

ARTICLE FIRST - That the Lodge be held at Brother Lee’s, the Sign of the Golden Lyon, Sunderland, (till such time as it shall be determined otherwise according to the Ninth Article in the Book of Constitutions) on the first Wednesday in every Calendar month at the hour of Six in the Evening, from the beginning of October to the end of March, and from the beginning of April to the end of September at the hour of Seven in the Evening; and that the Junior Warden for the time being shall at the hour of Ten in each Lodge Night call in the Bill of Expenses and collect the Reckoning, and after the same is paid, no Brother, then present, shall be obliged to be at any further expense.

 

SECOND - That a Master’s Lodge be Held every third Wednesday in every month at the like Hours.

 

THIRD - That all and every the Rules and Regulations in the said Book of Constitutions sett forth and approved by the Grand Lodge be observed and kept.

 

FOURTH - That the Officers of this Lodge shall be one MASTER, one SENIOR WARDEN, one JUNIOR WARDEN and one SECRETARY; and that the Wardens for the time being shall act as Treasurers to the Lodge.

 

FIFTH - That the choice of Officers shall be determined by the Fourth Article in the Charges of a Free and Accepted Mason, agreeable to and sett forth in the said Book of Constitutions.

 

SIXTH - That the Master be invested with all proper authority to Regulate and Govern his Lodge in a Masonlike -manner agreeable to the Book of Constitutions and the rules and Order made at Grand Lodge from time to time, and that all Letters received from and sent to the Grand Lodge be copy’d in a book for that purpose.

 

SEVENTH - That every subscribing Brother shall for every General Lodge Night that he is absent (being summoned) pay into the Hands of the Treasurers, the sum of Sixpence to go into the Pedestal. Except Seafaring men when at sea of whom only threepence shall be taken., and such forfeitures to be collected of each Brother belonging this Lodge when they first appear after such forfeiture.

 

EIGHTH - That no Brother shall leave the Lodge ’till it be closed without Leave from the Master, and that only on particular Business.

 

NINETH - That there be no Makings nor Raisings but on a Regular Lodge Night, except on such urgent occasions as the Master and the Majority of the Brethren shall approve of, and every subscribing Brother shall Declare that he will as much as in him lyes, promote the good of Masonry in general and of this Lodge in particular.

 

TENTH - That at the Making of a Brother he shall pay into the hands of the Treasurers (if on a Lodge Night) the sum of one pound six shillings and sixpence out of which one pound to go to the Pedestal. But if an Extra Lodge be called for the Making of a Brother or Brethren he or they at that time so made shall pay five shillings towards the expenses of the Night over and above the sum of one pound six shillings and sixpence to be paid for making as aforesaid

 

ELEVENTH - That every Brother shall pay for the passing of Different Degrees of Masonry for each Degree the sum of five shillings, one shilling thereof to be spent and the remainder to go to the Pedestal. But if an Extra Lodge be called for the Passing and Raising any Brother or Brethren he or they at that time so Passed and Raised shall pay five shillings toward the Expenses of the Night over and above the sum of five shillings to be paid for passing or raising as aforesaid.

 

TWELFTH - That every Brother made in any other regularly Constituted Lodge, shall on his becoming a Subscriber to this Lodge, enjoy all the privileges equal with any Brother made in the same.

 

THIRTEENTH - That every Visiting Brother attending this Lodge shall be admitted agreeably to the Book of Constitutions and pay towards the expenses of the night, equal with the Subscribing Brethren then present.

 

FOURTEENTH - That if any Brother be guilty of swearing or any other Irregularity in this Lodge during lodge-hours, he shall be fined and pay into the hands of the Treasurers the sum of sixpence for every offence and upon his persisting in such Irregularities two Nights successively He so offending shall be excluded from this Lodge, and the same shall be noted down till he submit, and give such convincing Proofs of his Amendment as shall be acceptable to the Brethren.

 

FIFTEENTH - That one feast shall be held Annually on the twenty-seventh day of December being Saint John the Evangelist, that all Freemasons be invited and that all attending pay equally - and that all subscribing Brethren belonging to this Lodge not attending on this day shall forfeit the sum of Two shillings which shall go towards defraying the expense of the Day, except Seafaring men when at sea.

 

SIXTEENTH - That every Brother who shall propose any person to be made a Mason in this Lodge, shall at the time pay into the hands of the Treasurers half a Guinea, which when the person so proposed is made, shall be deducted out of the one pound six shillings and sixpence the sum to be paid by every person made in this Lodge - But in the case of the person so proposed shall neglect to be made the said Half Guinea so Deposited shall be forfeited to the Lodge - Also Notice shall be given at least one Lodge Night previous to a person being made a Mason, who shall be made on a Regular Lodge Night without the most urgent. Necessity, and if propose to be Passed or Raised to Deposit Half a Crown for each Degree and if not Made, Passed or Raised within Six months from the time of Depositing, the respective Deposits to be forfeited to the Pedestal for the use of the Lodge, except Seafaring men to whom twelve months are allowed for the purposes above said.

 

SEVENTEENTH - That the articles of the Lodge be read over to every new made Brother at the time of making as soon as convenient, and that every Member desiring a Certificate from this Lodge shall pay for the same, Two Shillings to go into the Pedestal

The Confirmation Warrant

 

This is the Warrant under which the Lodge works and is expressed in the following terms:-

 

Augustus Frederick

 

G.M. To all and every our Right Worshipful and Loving Brethren.

 

We, Prince Augustus Frederick of Brunswick, Duke of Sussex, Earl of Inverness, Baron of Arklow, Knight Companion of the most Noble Order of the Garter, etc., etc., etc.,

 

Grand Master

 

Of the Most Ancient and Honourable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons. Whereas it appears by the Records of our Grand Lodge that a Warrant bearing date 7th October, 1755, was issued under the Seal of Masonry enabling certain Brethren therein named to open and hold a Lodge of Freemasons at Sunderland, it became No.169. By the closing of the List of Lodges in the year 1781it became No.136. In the year 1792 it became No.121, and which Lodge in consequence of the Union of the two Fraternities of Masons on 27th day of December, 1813, became and is now registered on the books of United Grand Lodge No.146, and is held at the Phoenix Hall in Sunderland aforesaid under the title and denomination of the Phoenix Lodge. And Whereas the Brethren composing the said Lodge have by their memorial dated the 26th day of November, 1820 presented to us that their said Warrant hath by some accident been lost or destroyed and they have therefore prayed us to grant them a Warrant of Confirmation unto our trusty and well beloved Brethren, Edward grimes, William Nicholson, William Stevenson, Joseph Gardiner, John Robson, The Rev. Birkett Dawson, B.D., Robert Ward, David Keith, and others composing the said Lodge, authorising and empowering them and their successors to assemble and hold a Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons , at the Phoenix hall aforesaid under the title or denomination of the Phoenix Lodge, at such times as to the Brethren may appear necessary and then and there when duly congregated to make pass and raise Freemasons according to the Ancient Custom of the Craft in all ages and nations throughout the known world. And further at the petition of the said Brethren We do appoint the said Edward Grimes to be the Master, and the said William Stevenson to be the Senior Warden, and the said Joseph Gardiner to be the Junior Warden for opening and holding the said Lodge and until such time as another Master shall be regularly elected and installed strictly charging that every Master who shall be elected to preside over the said Lodge shall be installed in ancient form and according to the Laws of the Grand Lodge, that they may be thereby fully invested with the Dignities and powers of his office, the said Lodge to be on the Grand Register of our Grand Lodge No.146. And we do require you the said Edward grimes and your successors, to especially care that all and every the said Brethren are or have been regularly made Masons, and that you and they and all other the members of the said Lodge do observe perform and keep the laws, Rules and Orders contained in the Book of Constitutions and all others which may from time to time be made by our Grand Lodge or transmitted by us or our successors, Grand Masters, or by our Deputy Grand Master for the time being. And we do enjoin you to make such byelaws for the Government of your Lodge as shall to the majority of the members appear proper and necessary the same not being contrary to and inconsistent with the General Laws and Regulations of the Craft and a copy whereof you are to transmit to us. And we do require you to cause all such Byelaws and Regulations and also an account of the proceedings in your Lodge to be entered in the Book to kept for that purpose. And you are in no wise to omit to send to us, or our successors, Grand masters, or to the Right Hon. Lawrence Lord Dundas our Deputy Grand Master or to the Deputy Grand Master for the time being at least once in every year a List of the members of your Lodge and the names and descriptions of all Masons initiated therein and Brethren who shall have joined the same with the fees and monies payable thereon, it being our will and intention that this our Warrant of Confirmation shall be in force so long as you shall conform to the Laws and Reg[1]ulations of our said Grand Lodge. And you the said Edward Grimes are further required as soon as conveniently may be sent to us an account in writing of what may be done by virtue of these presents. Given under our hand and the Seal of the Grand Lodge at London this 29th day of Septem[1]ber A.L. 5821, A.D. 1821.

 

By command of the M.W. Grand Master DUNDAS, D.G.M.

 

William H. White G.S.

Edw. Harper G.S.

Sunderland Exchange

 

In 1812 the foundation stone of the Sunderland Exchange was laid with Masonic honours. The present appearance of the building is somewhat different from the original structure, which at the time was termed “chaste and elegant”.

 

In addition to it being used as a Town Hall, it was part of a scheme that the building should be used as an Exchange, Auction Mart, Coffee Room and Post Office.

 

On 10th August 1812 the foundation stone was laid by Sir Henry Vane Tempest, Bart., M.P. acting as Provincial Grand Master, pro. tem., in the absence of Sir Ralph Milbanke, Bart. The other Officers present were:-

 

Bro. Alex. Logan, DProvGM

Bro. Chipchase, Mayor of Durham, ProvSGW

Bro. Sir Cuthbert Sharp, ProvJGW

Bro. Rev. Blackett, ProvGChaplain

Bro. L. Pennington, ProvGSecretary

 

The procession went from Phoenix Hall, preceded the Sunderland Volunteer Infantry. A plate with an inscription having been deposited on the stone, the usual ceremonies were gone through, after which the Volunteers presented arms. After the Prov G Chaplain delivered an Oration, the Volunteers fired three volleys in the air. The procession then returned to the Phoenix Hall where 185 people dined.

 

The dinner bill gives a glimpse of the customs of society in 1812;-

 

185 Dinners at 3s/6p £32 7s 6d

104 Bottles of sherry 34 4s 0d

196 Port , 5s/6d 53 18s 0d

Glass broken 6 13s 7d 2 doz.

Porter 0 18s 0p

Total £128 1s 1p

 

On 26th May 1814 the Exchange Building was opened to the Subscribers.

 

The building cost £8,000 subscribed by individuals in £50 shares. Half of the ground rent was purchased from Sir Henry Vane Tempest for £600, and the lease of the moiety was obtained for 63 years under £10 rent.

List Of Past Masters That Can Be Determined From Records Extant


1775 G.THOMPSON, ProvGM

1776 G.THOMPSON, ProvGM

1777 G.THOMPSON, ProvGM

1778 G.THOMPSON, ProvGM

1779 G.THOMPSON, ProvGM

1780 G.THOMPSON, ProvGM

1781 G.THOMPSON, ProvGM

1782 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1783 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1784 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1785 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1786 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1787 W. FERGUSON

1788 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1789 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1790 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1791 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1792 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1793 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1794 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1795 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1796 Dr. T. BROWN, MD

1797 T. WILSON

1798 T. WILSON

1799 T. WILSON

1800 T. WILSON

1801 T. WILSON

1802 T. WILSON

1803 W. EDEN

1804 W. EDEN

1805 W. EDEN

1806 W. EDEN

1807 W. EDEN

1808 W. EDEN

1809 W. EDEN

1810 T. WILSON

1811 T. WILSON

1812 T. BONNER & D. HOPPER

1813 T. ROBSON

1814 T. BONNER

1815 T. BONNER

1816 T. BONNER

1817 W. NICHOLSON

1818 E. GRIMES

1819 E. GRIMES

1820 D. HOPPER

1821 E. GRIMES

1822 E. GRIMES

1823 E. GRIMES

1824 F. STAFFORD

1825 F. STAFFORD 1826 W. BAGLEE

1827 W. BAGLEE

1828 J. LINDSAY

1829 J. LINDSAY

1830 W. BAGLEE

1831 W. BAGLEE

1832 J. HALL

1833 E. BROWELL

1834 E. BROWELL

1835 J. SPARK

1836 J. SPARK

1837 J. SPARK & W. BAGLEE

1838 W. BAGLEE & E. BROWELL

1839 E. BROWELL & T. BOND

1840 J. SPARK

1841 W. BAGLEE

1842 W. BAGLEE

1843 W. BAGLEE

1844 J. CULLIFORD

1845 L. CHATT

1846 J. MUDDLESTONE

1847 J. WOLSENHOLME

1848 J. CULLIFORD

1849 J. SHIELD

1850 L. CHATT

1851 E. HENSHALL

1852 J. CULLIFORD

1853 M. BROWN

1854 W. CHARLETON

1855 W. ATTEY

1856 W. CHARLETON

1857 W. CHARLETON

1858 Dr. J.R. POTTS

1859 J. GLAHOLME

1860 P. MADDISON

1861 G.R.M. GILMORE

1862 J.J. STILES

1863 J. RISEBOROUGH

1864 W. WHIMHAM

1865 J. WILSON

1866 T. WHIMHAM

1867 T. HALLIDAY

1868 W. SCOTT

1869 W.H. SHARP

1870 T. HENDERSON

1871 G. WANLESS

1872 J.S. PEARSON

1873 R.B. LUTERT

1874 T. SURTEES

1875 T. CAIRNS

1876 J.D. TODD

1877 W.W. COLLIE

1878 M. FRAMPTON

1879 M. FRAMPTON

1880 E. SUTHERST

1881 J.R. SMART

1882 J. HUDSON

1883 J. DIXON

1884 J.A. RAINBOW

1885 T.S. GARRICK

1886 W. DAWSON

1887 J. SCARBOROUGH

1888 J.W.H. SWAN

1889 G. CRAVEN

1890 W. MASON

1891 W. VINCENT

1892 W.D. THOMPSON

1893 W.G. HETHERINGTON

1894 W. WATSON

1895 M. COHEN

1896 T.O. TODD

1897 E.H. TILLEY

1898 J.M. THOMPSON

1899 J. JACOBS

1900 H.T. HALFPENNY

1901 W.H. HOPE

1902 C.W. FRYERS

1903 J.D. TODD, Jnr.

1904 H.C. PAPE

1905 A. WHITE

1906 W. DEAKIN

1907 R.W. GRAHAM

1908 G. HATELY

1909 J. SUMMERS

1910 J.R. EMMERSON

1911 E.J. EVERDELL

1912 E. LAWSON

1913 J. SPENCER

1914 G.H. FAIRER

1915 J. JOHNSON

1916 C. MARSHALL

1917 W. BELL

1918 W.F. YELLAND

1919 J.E. BROWN

1920 J.F. SMITH

1921 J.C. SMITH

1922 C.W. FRYERS, Jnr.

1923 E. IRWING

1924 H. RATALLACK

1925 W.O. ROSS

1926 C.H. BEAMSON

1927 J.O. SUNLEY

1928 F.F. ADAMSON

1929 F. DARK

1930 R. MACFARLANE

1931 A.H. THWAITES

1932 Dr. W. MARTIN

1933 J. SCOULAR

1934 A.E. HAMMINGTON

1935 J.G. PARKER

1936 C.L. BROWN

1937 A. STEPHENSON

1938 J. PALMER

1939 T. ROBERTSON

1940 W.E.G. PORTER

1941 R.M. GREGSON

1942 R.R. DITCHBURN

1943 T.W. SCARTH

1944 J. BROWN

1945 W.B. PARKER, DCM

1946 J. MILLS

1947 F.P. SUTTON

1948 G.L. PUNSHON

1949 R.T.E. PROCTER

1950 A.B.E. JEFFREY

1951 W.R. TAYLOR

1952 G.W. MUSHENS

1953 W.L. CROFTON

1954 C.W. KIRKALDY

1955 S. STEVENSON

1956 A.L. DURRANT

1957 J.E. JONES

1958 W.T. WATSON

1959 F.C. FRASER

1960 H. PEARCH

1961 J.W. HESLOP

1962 G.W. MUSHENS, Jnr.

1963 E. GOLDSWORTHY

1964 J.R. BRYANT

1965 J.S. THOMPSON

1966 J.W. SAYERS

1967 G.M. GRAHAM

1968 J.F. BROWN

1969 J.S. THOMPSON, Jnr.

1970 H. GALLANTREE

1971 J.E. THURLBECK

1972 H.C. FORSTER

1973 A.P.S. BROWNING

1974 G. TOULSON

1975 B. ARMSTRONG

1976 D. SLOAN

1977 R. CRAIG

1978 A.K. HERBERT

1979 J. JAMES

1980 J.C. MORRISON 1

981 R. KNOWLES

1982 N. DRUMMOND

1983 C. DONNISON

1984 D.W. McHARRY

1985 D. TEALE

1986 J.W. BELL

1987 G.G. RACKSTRAW

1988 M. RUTTER

1989 J.A. HOPE

1990 S. HARRIS

1991 D.W. GIBBINS, PPrAGDC

1992 J.W. WALTON

1993 D.C. JOHNSON

1994 C.J. GRAHAM

1995 J.S. THOMPSON, Jnr., PPrGSwdB

1996 S.P.G. HARRIS

1997 A.S. GIBBINS

1998 G.B. FLETCHER

1999 J.W. SAYERS, PPrJGW

2000 A. SIMPSON, PPrJGD

2001 A. SIMPSON, PPrJGD

2002 S.M. PATEL

2003 G. RICHARDSON

2004 J. JAMES, PPrGReg

OFFICERS INVESTED 1st DECEMBER 2004

 

W.Bro. JOHN JAMES, PM, PPrGReg ......................................Master

W.Bro. ROBERT HENRY GREENMAN, ProvSGD......................S.W.

Bro. DAVID ANTHONY VAUGHAN ....................................... J.W.

W.Bro. HENRY CARTER FORSTER, PM, PPrGSwdB .........Chaplain

W.Bro. ALAN KEITH HERBERT,PM, PPrJGW ................. Treasurer

W.Bro. JAMES WILLIAM SAYERS, PM, PPrJGW..............Secretary

W.Bro. SELBY PETER GEORGE HARRIS, PM, PPrGSwdB.. .... D.C.

Bro. GEORGE LESLIE COPLEY.......................................Almoner

W.Bro. SELBY PETER GEORGE HARRIS, PM, PPrGSwdB ............. Charity Steward

Bro. CRAIG SELBY HARRIS....................................................S.D.

Bro. RICHARD STEVEN VARDY.............................................J.D.

W.Bro. ALFRED SNOWDON GIBBINS, PM, PPrSGD.............A.D.C.

W.Bro. ALAN KEITH HERBERT, PM, PPrJGW .................. Organist

Bro. CARLTON GLYNDWR WOODCOCK ........................... ..I.G. STEWARDS

Bro. RODERICK CAMERON, PPrGStwd

Bro. HOWARD ARNOLD BRODERICK

Bro. RAYMOND BRACKEN

Bro. JAMES ALEXANDER BONALLIE

Bro. GEORGE LESLIE COPLEY

Bro. ERNEST LAMBERT

Bro. HENRY NISBET PACKARD

Bro. LIAM COLIN PORTER

Bro. RICHARD SIMPSON

Bro. DAVID WARD Snr

Bro. DAVID WARD, Jnr

Bro. JOHN WRIGHT

Bro. RAYMOND PRICE..........................................................Tyler

W.Bro. GERALD RICHARDSON, PM ....................................... I.P.M.